Friday, June 10, 2016

Here Are The Roadkill Laws in All 50 States



I could not find a list of roadkill laws anywhere on the internet despite hours of searching so I emailed every state’s Fish and Wildlife and asked them these two questions:


1. What, if any, species are legal to pick up after they have been hit by a vehicle in your state?
2. What protocols must one follow before picking up an animal that has been killed by a vehicle, ie contacting the proper authorities, getting a license, etc?


Most of them answered, but the ones that did not are labeled "No information available". This is what they said:





***Remember that federally protected species are illegal to possess in every state. This includes birds of prey and song birds.***


1.  Technically, only road-killed game animals during open the season or unprotected animals may be  retrieved for personal usage. All migratory birds (except those listed as game birds) are protected under Federal law and cannot be possessed. However, we do not prosecute those individuals that pick up bonafide roadkills.
2.  A phone call to an area DCNR office or officer is sufficient.


1.      Animals killed on the roadway belong to the State of Alaska. A person is not authorized to pick up any animal that is struck by a vehicle. Animals that are used as food (moose, caribou etc..) are salvaged through a road kill program and given to charity groups that use the meat for food purposes.


2.      People are not allowed to pick up animals unless they have been contacted by the State Troopers to get the animal.


1.       It is legal to pick up big game that has been killed as a result of a vehicle collision.
2.       The protocol is outlined in state statute under Arizona Revised Statute 17-319 and is included below for your reference:


17-319. Big game killed by motor vehicle; salvage permit; violation; classification
A. Notwithstanding any other provision of this title, the carcass of a big game animal that has been killed as a result of an accidental collision with a motor vehicle on a maintained road may be possessed and transported by the driver of the vehicle if the driver first obtains a big game salvage permit issued by a peace officer. A person may possess or transport the carcass or any part of the carcass of a big game animal killed as a result of an accidental collision with a motor vehicle only as provided by this section.
B. The department shall provide big game salvage permit forms to peace officers on request. The permit may be issued only in the name of the driver of the motor vehicle and is not transferable. The permit form shall require the following information:
1. The name and address of the motor vehicle driver.
2. A description of the big game animal that was killed.
3. The date of the collision.
4. The specific location of the collision.
5. A description of the motor vehicle.
6. The destination where the carcass will be transported.
7. The name of the peace officer who issued the permit.
C. The peace officer shall:
1. Complete all of the information required on the permit.
2. Give the original of the permit to the driver of the motor vehicle.
3. Mail a copy of the permit to the department within forty-eight hours after issuing the permit.
D. A peace officer may inspect the carcass and motor vehicle prior to issuing the permit. The carcass and motor vehicle are subject to inspection by a game ranger within twenty days after issuance of the permit. If the carcass has been processed or if the motor vehicle has been repaired, a game ranger may inspect the invoices or other documents recording the processing or repair.
E. A person who possesses the carcass of a big game animal pursuant to this section may place all or part of the carcass in storage pursuant to section 17-373 or may make a gift of the carcass or parts to another individual.
F. A permit issued under this section carries no representation or implication that any part of the carcass is edible. Neither the peace officer, the agency employing the peace officer nor the department is liable with respect to any use made of the carcass.
G. A person who possesses a carcass of a big game animal under authority of a big game salvage permit that was obtained by fraud is guilty of a class 1 misdemeanor.


I will add, we are in the process of updating our roadkill salvage permit to make it easier for peace officers other than Game and Fish officers (i.e. Highway Patrol, Sheriffs Department, local police departments, etc) to understand the process since they are the ones who usually distribute the salvage permits and are generally the first repsonders and/or the ones who take the wildlife/vehicle collision reports.   


1. Species which are not protected by federal law or game wildlife that require a tag to harvest.  Contact AGFCs Enforcement Hotline 24/7. 1-800-482-9262


2. Prior to picking up species which are not protected by federal law or game wildlife that require a tag to harvest, contact Arkansas Game and Fish Commission's Enforcement Hotline and report it.  This line is answered 24/7.  1-800-482-9262


California is one of the few (at least so I’ve been told) states that does not permit picking up roadkill. The reasoning is that all legal “methods of take” are spelled out in the regulations. Any means of capturing, pursuing or killing that is not expressly permitted by law is thereby presumed to be disallowed.
To put it very simply: a vehicle is not classified as a legal method of take for any animal in California.


1. Bighorn Sheep and mountain goats that are road kills will be picked up and retained by CPW. Meat may be donated according to Commission Regulation #016 (C). Head, hide, and horns may not be auctioned or bartered per Commission Regulation #018 (A), but may be loaned by a letter of authorization issued by a CPW supervisor to a school, museum or other facility receiving the items. Letters will not be issued to individuals in any institutions.
2. Bear, mountain lion, and bobcat-- it will be the Commissioned Officers's decision to allow public possession only with the purchase of a license during established seasons (i.e. deer and elk hunters can purchase a bear license for use during their deer or elk season). Outside of an established season, the AWM can, at their discretion, issue another type of license to legitimize the possession. (Note that the test for a mountain lion license is still required.) Hides must be sealed immediately by authorized CPW personnel, #017 (B). Meat may be donated according to Commission Regulation #016 (C).
3. Deer, Elk, Pronghorn, and Moose the public shall be allowed to retain the antlers/horns on the skull plate if less than Sampson size, unless there are extenuating circumstances. AWM Guideline: If antlers or horns are within Samson Law guidelines, CPW may retain them for educational use or auction. Velvet antlers may not be auctioned or bartered per Commission Regulation #18 (A). Therefore, unless there is an educational or other State use of velvet antlers, they may be donated to any recipient with the provision that it is understood that the items may not be sold or bartered.
4. All furbearers including prine marten, mink, fox, weasels, opossum, raccoon, and ringtail cats, etc., may be possessed with a small game or furbearer license.
5. Nongame mammals such as chipmunks, pika, or nongame squirrels may be donated with a donation certificate.
6. Hawks, owls, eagles, and other federally restricted birds may be donated ONLY to an approved scientific, educational or governmental entity with the proper federal permits already in place.
7. Endangered species and threatened species may not be possessed.


More Road Kill Regulations:


Individuals can keep edible portions from road kill deer, elk, and antelope. In 1990, a regulation was passed allowing individuals to pick up road kill big game (Deer, elk, antelope).


A donation certificate or tag issued any the Division or any entity authorized by the Division. A person must notify the Division or other authorized agency within 48 hours of taking possession of the animal to obtain a donation certificate. The person requesting the certificate may have to present the animal for inspection, to verify its possession meets the criteria of this regulation.


No information available.


No information available.


Florida allows motorists to possess deer, fox, raccoon, opossum, gray and fox squirrel that have been killed by a vehicle collision. If the animal is being possessed out of season (deer), the protocol would be for the motorist to notify FWC and provide his or her contact information in case an Officer wants to inspect the animal. No other animal or bird can be possessed unless the possessor is permitted and notification has been provided to FWC.


No information available.


No information available.


No information available.


It is also legal to pick up any roadkill furbearing mammals that are in season if you have the proper hunting or trapping license and/or habitat stamp as required for each species. This includes raccoons, opossum, striped skunk, weasel, mink, muskrat, red fox, gray fox, coyote, badger, bobcat, beaver and river otter. River otters are also subject to CITES tags and otter registration permit requirements. There are no additional reporting requirements for these animals. I have attached a copy of the 2015-2016 hunting digest with information on possession of furbearer mammals on pg. 26.  Other than deer and fur bearing mammals, no game may be possessed freshly killed out of season. Any other species must be legal to take, must be in season and with proper hunting licenses and stamps as required.


No information available.


No information available.


I have attached our regulation (see Kansas cont. at bottom of article) that speaks to salvage tags for big game animals and turkey.  A salvage tag would be required to pick up big game or turkey roadkill but a hunting license would not be required with a big game salvage tag.


Opossum are a furbearer in KS and roadkills could only be possessed during the furbearer season with a valid furharvester license.  Squirrels are considered small game and roadkills could be possessed with a valid hunting license during season.  Regs attached.


No more than 5 groundhog could be possessed at any one time with a valid hunting license.  Reg attached.


1. All species can be collected from roadways in Kentucky unless special circumstances apply…such as the agency wants the animal for scientific collection purposes etc…
2. Conservation officer must be contacted to acquire a disposal permit for deer, elk, turkey, bear, bobcat and river otter (all species that must be telechecked if harvested by legal hunting methods)  Small mammals such as rabbits, squirrels etc…can be collected without disposal permit.


None are legal to just pick up without prior consent.  After a collision the operator is required to contact authorities who then get in contact with LDWF (Louisiana Dept. of Wildlife and Fisheries).  LDWF will then ask if they want to keep the animal.  If the answer is yes, then LDWF will fill out a donation form for the person to keep the animal.  If the answer is no, then LDWF will come and retrieve the animal and donate it to charity.  I think this answer also answers the second question.


In answer to your questions, it is legal to pick up most animals that have fallen victim to vehicle/animal collisions. With big game animals, you must have a transportation permit (acquired from a game warden or other law enforcement officer) before you take it. Smaller fur bearing animals will require a fur tag if you plan on having them mounted or stuffed.
The only species that aren’t permitted to be taken are protected species, such as eagles or hawks. When these are found, they should be reported to US Fish and Wildlife.


No information available.


No information available.


1. A salvage tag shall only be issued for deer, bear or other game that is killed by a motor vehicle or injured and euthanized as allowed by law following a collision with a motor vehicle.
2.The recipient must contact a Law Enforcement Agency, Department of Natural Resources, or have a hard copy Game Salvage Tag issued by a Law Enforcement Officer.


No information available.


No information available.


To be in legal possession of a dead animal, you either need to have the appropriate hunting permits/tags or you need to obtain a disposition (approval) from your local conservation agent. You can obtain these dispositions by contacting a local agent, who typically will ask a few questions to make certain the animal was taken legally. We only ask that you contact your local agent “as soon as possible” after seeing the animal or picking it up.


No information available.


No information available.


No information available.


No information available.


Only road-killed deer may be possessed, and a permit must be obtained from a local or state law enforcement officer to possess it.  It can be possessed for consumption only and antler possession from such deer is not legal.  See pages 14 and 26 in our Hunting Digest (http://www.njfishandwildlife.com/dighnt15.htm ) for more information.


No information available.


In NY State, some type of license or tag would be needed, depending upon the species.
Big game, such as bear and deer may be taken with a tag written up by a Law Enforcement officer. This is usually done for someone that actually has the collision with the animal, but it could be provided to another individual if the driver from the accident doesn’t want the carcass.
Small mammals and birds would require a license through the DEC for possession. It is usually referred to as a “salvage” permit. Migratory bird collection would also require a Federal license, in addition to the State license.


Vehicle-killed Game and Possession
A person who accidentally kills a wild turkey, deer or bear while operating a motor vehicle on a highway can take possession of the carcass and remove it from the scene of the accident if the carcass is first registered over the phone by DNR staff. If the operator of the vehicle that killed the animal does not want the carcass, any other person can request a free tag for the carcass. Contact the Wisconsin DNR car killed registration line at 608-267-7691 to obtain the registration.
A person who accidentally kills small game animals while operating a motor vehicle on a highway can take possession of the carcass without the need to obtain a tag only if:
1. The animal is NOT a fisher, otter, bobcat, wolf, migratory bird or a protected, endangered or threatened species;
2. The person possesses a license authorizing the hunting or trapping of the kind of animal that was killed; AND the animal was killed during the open season for that species;
3. If the operator of the vehicle that killed the animal does not want to take possession of the carcass, then any person with a license authorizing the hunting or trapping of that animal may take possession of the carcass if it is during an open season for the species.


Each of the species are treated a little differently from the others. I can give you the regulations/process for most species, with the exception of Waterfowl and Raptors. They are regulated by the US Fish and Wildlife Service, and you would need to contact them about what you could possess.

In order to pick up most roadkill, a permit needs to be obtained, especially for Big Game. (Deer, Bighorn Sheep, Elk, Moose.) For deer, a warden or other ND Law Enforcement Officer would be called, and a permit to possess tag could be issued. It is similar to a regular hunting tag, with a head and carcass tag included. For Elk, Moose or Bighorn Sheep, a ND Game & Fish Warden would need to be contacted, and they make the decision on whether to issue a tag or not, since they are in the Big 3 of Big Game.

For furbearers and small game, the same process is followed, unless a person has a current hunting license for the game, and it is within the hunting season for that species. If that is the case, they can just pick it up. There are exceptions, such as for Mountain Lions, and some species that are not legal for Non-residents to possess, since their State may not have reciprocal licenses for our residents. In either of these situations, a call to a ND Game & Fish Warden would be required.

There are some smaller species that a Resident of North Dakota does not need a license to hunt. They are considered ‘Non-game’ species, and a resident may pick them up whenever they see them. Non-residents would need the appropriate license to do so. These species include Prairie Dog, Skunk, Porcupine, Rabbits & Hares, and Ground Squirrels.

In any case, it is not guaranteed that a permit would be issued because it is requested. Each situation is evaluated on a case by case basis.





No information available.


No information available.


1. The only road kill wildlife that can be possessed are non game nonprotected species, i.e. rabbits, rodents, coyote, marmots, skunks, mice, opossum, nutria, and weasels etc.. and furbearers during the appropriate seasons with a furbearer license and appropriate tags.
2. None unless it is a furbearer, than a furbearer license and tag if one is required for that furbearer, ie. bobcat, river otter.


In Pennsylvania you may not take road-killed animals unless you get a consumption permit to eat it (deer/turkey). Even then, you may not keep the antlers of a deer taken for consumption.
Salvage permits are only for educational purposes and education institutions not private individuals.
You’d need to contact the appropriate region office to inquire about a free consumption permit for turkey and deer within 24 hours. Region office contact information can be found here: http://tiny.cc/ROffice


No information available.


No information available.


A person can pick up deer and antelope with notification and authorization.  We do not allow the public to directly acquire road hit lions, turkey, elk, big horn sheep, mountain goats or other big game animals (other than deer and antelope).  This is because these other species are more rare, we will try and salvage and generally try and find a use or the other animals like a local food bank, or known needy family.  There is some officer/supervisor discretion involved too.   No other specific allowances for other species such as predator/varmint, waterfowl or small game.  We would likely allow someone to pick up some of the other small game/predator/varmint species provided the season was open and the person had the necessary licenses to possess the animal.
41-1-5.7. Disposition of deer and antelope killed by motor vehicle.  If any deer or antelope is killed by a motor vehicle on a public highway, any person who desires to possess that animal shall notify a conservation officer, as defined by § 41-15-10, prior to taking possession of the animal. The conservation officer may give a dated and written authorization allowing possession of the animal. The conservation officer may give verbal authorization to take immediate possession of the animal prior to receipt of the written authorization. The written authorization allows the possession and disposal of the animal. The written authorization shall remain with the carcass while in processing or storage. No part of an animal so obtained may be sold, bartered or traded. There is no fee for the issuance of such authorization.


Tenn. Code Ann. § 70-4-115
(c) Motorists are not required to report game accidentally killed by the operation of a motor vehicle. Notwithstanding any other provision of the law to the contrary, wild animals accidentally killed by a motor vehicle may be possessed by any person for personal use and consumption; except that, first, personal possession of a deer accidentally killed by a motor vehicle is permitted only if the person notifies the wildlife resources agency or any law enforcement officer within a reasonable time not to exceed forty-eight (48) hours and supplies that person's name and address; and second, personal possession of a bear accidentally killed by a motor vehicle is permitted only when authorized by an enforcement officer of the wildlife resources agency and the person is issued a kill tag. In deer-kill notification situations where a law enforcement officer rather than someone with the wildlife resources agency is notified, the law enforcement officer or the officer's designee shall be responsible for notifying someone with the wildlife resources agency and supplying the information relevant to the deer-kill. Nothing in this section authorizes possession of federally protected wildlife or wildlife protected by the state under chapter 8 of this title.


No information available.


You are allowed to pick up non protected animals, skunks, raccoons, etc.. For animals that are protected, like deer and elk, you have to contact a wildlife biologist or conservation officer and receive a salvage permit.


Any species, with the exception of federally protected animals such as birds of prey and songbirds, are legal to pick up in Vermont after being killed by a vehicle.  Big game animals (deer, bear, moose, and turkey) and furbearers (otter, fisher, bobcat, coyotes, foxes, raccoons, etc.) can be picked up, but one must contact a warden before doing so to get permission and a possession tag.  We do this as people will sometimes illegally kill these species and we need to check the animal to ensure that it wasn’t killed by poaching.  Also, the biologists keep track of the numbers of big game animals and some furbearers killed on the road to assist with population estimates.  Other animals that have seasons for taking and bag limits (rabbits/squirrels/grouse etc.), are legal to pick up but one should confer with a warden before doing so, but it isn’t necessary.  However a warden would certainly question a person found to be in possession of such animal outside the season.  All other animals that aren’t protected in Vermont (woodchucks/red squirrels etc.) can be picked up without permission.
      You would go about reporting a wildlife vehicle collision by contacting a warden or Vermont State Police dispatch.


§ 29.1-539. Keeping deer or bear struck by motor vehicle; procedure to be followed by driver.
Any person driving a motor vehicle who collides with a deer or bear may, upon compliance with the provisions of this section, keep the deer or bear for his own use as if the animal had been killed by that person during hunting season for the animal.
Any person so killing any deer or bear shall immediately report the accident to the conservation police officer or other law-enforcement officer of the county or city where the accident occurred. The conservation police officer or other law-enforcement officer shall view the deer or bear and if he believes that the deer or bear was killed by the collision with the motor vehicle or injured to such an extent as to require its death, he shall award the animal to the person claiming the deer or bear, and shall give the person a certificate to that effect on forms furnished by the Department.
1950, pp. 441, 442, §§ 29-155.2 to 29-155.4; 1980, c. 271; 1987, c. 488; 2007, c. 87.
So the black and white of it is that only the person driving the vehicle that struck the animal may take a deer or bear that has been hit. That person has to call law enforcement to be given a check card before it can be taken into possession. There are no other sections pertaining to vehicle collisions; this means that there are no other animals that may be taken into possession from road kill. Currently our biologists are working on getting this code changed or another added to permit others (that may come upon it) to take road kill animals and other animals to be added to the list. Other animals may not be taken into possession right now because a vehicle collision is not a legal means for harvesting them.
The only other means a person may take road kill is through the use of a salvage permit. Found: http://www.dgif.virginia.gov/permits/salvage-permit-application.pdf This permit allows for any animal to be picked up for three years except for threatened/endangered/protected species and any birds protected by the Federal Migratory Bird Treaty Act. For birds it would be required, as you can see on the permit application, to also obtain a U S Fish & Wildlife Service Salvage Permit. Please refer to the permit application for any further information. After sending it in, the application goes under review by the permits section of our department before it is issued.


We have a law in WA State making it illegal to pick up any type of road kill.




20-2-4. Possession of wildlife.
(a) Except for wildlife, lawfully taken, killed or obtained, no person may have in his or her possession any wildlife, or parts thereof, during closed seasons. It is unlawful to possess any wildlife, or parts thereof, which have been illegally taken, killed or obtained. Any wildlife illegally taken, killed or possessed shall be forfeited to the state and shall be counted toward the daily, seasonal, bag, creel and possession limit of the person in possession of, or responsible for, the illegal taking or killing of any wildlife.
(b) Wildlife lawfully taken outside of this state is subject to the same laws and rules as wildlife taken within this state.
(c) Migratory wild birds may be possessed only in accordance with the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, 16 U.S.C. 703, et seq., and its regulations.
(d) The restrictions in this section do not apply to the director or duly authorized agents, who may take or maintain in captivity any wildlife for the purpose of carrying out the provisions of this chapter.
(e) Wildlife, except protected birds, elk, spotted fawn, and bear cubs, killed or mortally wounded as a result of being accidentally or inadvertently struck by a motor vehicle may be lawfully possessed if the possessor of the wildlife provides notice of the claim within twelve hours to a relevant law-enforcement agency, and obtains a nonhunting game tag within twenty-four hours of possession. The director shall propose administrative policy which addresses the means, methods and administrative procedures for implementing the provisions of this section.
(f) Persons required to deliver wildlife to an official checking station shall, in accordance with rules promulgated by the director, electronically register the wildlife in lieu of the delivery to an official checking station. Electronically register means submission of all necessary and relevant information to the division, in the manner designated by rule, in lieu of delivery of the wildlife to an official checking station. The director may promulgate rules, pursuant to article three [ 29A-3-1 et seq.], chapter twenty-nine-a of this code, governing the electronic registration of wildlife.


Vehicle-killed Game and Possession
A person who accidentally kills a wild turkey, deer or bear while operating a motor vehicle on a highway can take possession of the carcass and remove it from the scene of the accident if the carcass is first registered over the phone by DNR staff. If the operator of the vehicle that killed the animal does not want the carcass, any other person can request a free tag for the carcass. Contact the Wisconsin DNR car killed registration line at 608-267-7691 to obtain the registration.
A person who accidentally kills small game animals while operating a motor vehicle on a highway can take possession of the carcass without the need to obtain a tag only if:
1. The animal is NOT a fisher, otter, bobcat, wolf, migratory bird or a protected, endangered or threatened species;
2. The person possesses a license authorizing the hunting or trapping of the kind of animal that was killed; AND the animal was killed during the open season for that species;
3. If the operator of the vehicle that killed the animal does not want to take possession of the carcass, then any person with a license authorizing the hunting or trapping of that animal may take possession of the carcass if it is during an open season for the species.


1.  It is illegal to pick up any road killed animals for human consumption.


2.  Road kill may be salvaged for purposes other than human consumption with prior approval from a game warden.  Any animals or animal parts salvaged must be tagged with a Wyoming interstate game tag issued by a game warden.  Failing to meet these requirements is a violation of Wyoming's wildlife possession/transportation laws.


Kansas Continued:
R-04-02.jpg
SEQ CHAPTER \h \r 1115-20-2.  Certain wildlife; legal equipment, taking methods, possession, and license requirement.  (a)   Subject to federal and state laws and rules and regulations, wildlife listed below in subsection (b) may be taken for personal use on a noncommercial basis.
(b)  For purposes of this regulation, wildlife shall include the following, excluding any species listed in K.A.R. 115-15-1 or K.A.R. 115-15-2:
(1)  Amphibians; except bullfrogs;
(2)  armadillo;
(3)  commensal and other rodents, excluding game and furbearing animals;
(4)  feral pigeon;
(5)  gopher;
(6)  ground squirrel;
(7)  invertebrates;
(8)  kangaroo rat;
(9)  mole;
(10)  porcupine;
(11)  prairie dog;
(12)  reptiles, except common snapping turtles and soft-shelled turtles;
(13)  woodchuck; and
(14)  wood rat.
(c)  Wildlife listed above in subsection (b) shall be taken only with any of the following legal equipment or methods:
(1)  Bow and arrow;
(2)  crossbow;
(3)  deadfall;
(4)  dogs;
(5)  falconry;
(6)  firearms, except fully automatic firearms;
(7)  glue board;
(8)  hand;
(9)  net or seine;
(10)  optical scopes or sights that project no visible light toward the target and do not electronically amplify visible or infrared light;
(11)  pellet and BB gun;
(12)  poison, poisonous gas, or smoke, if the toxicant is registered and labeled for that use and if all permit requirements for use of the poison, poisonous gas, or smoke have been met;
(13)  projectiles hand-thrown or propelled by a slingshot;
(14)  snare or noose; or
(15) trap.
(d)  The open season for the taking of wildlife listed above in subsection (b) shall be year-round.
(e)  There shall be no maximum daily bag or possession limit for wildlife listed above in subsection (b), except that no more than five of any one species of amphibian, reptile, or mussel may be possessed and no more than five live specimens of mussels may be possessed.  Two opposing shells shall constitute one mussel.
(f)  Legally taken wildlife listed above in subsection (b) may be possessed without limit in time.
(g)  A hunting license shall not be required to take invertebrates.     (Authorized by
K.S.A.  32-807; implementing K.S.A. 32-807, K.S.A. 32-919, K.S.A. 32-1002, and K.S.A. 32-1003; effective Sept. 10, 1990; amended Nov. 30, 1998; amended July 13, 2001; amended Nov. 22, 2002; amended Feb. 18, 2005.)


K.A.R. 115-20-2
Page


K.A.R. 115-20-2
Page


115-3-2.  Rabbits, hares, and squirrels; legal equipment, taking methods, and possession.  (a)  Legal hunting equipment for rabbits, hares, and squirrels shall consist of the following:
(1)  Firearms, except fully automatic rifles and handguns and except shotguns and muzzleloading shotguns larger than 10 gauge or using other than shot ammunition;
(2)  pellet and BB guns;
(3)  archery equipment;
(4)  crossbows;
(5)  falconry equipment;
(6)  projectiles hand-thrown or propelled by a slingshot;
(7)  box traps for rabbits only;
(8)  optical scopes or sights that project no visible light toward the target and do not electronically amplify visible or infrared light; and
(9)  other equipment or methods as allowed by permit.
(b)  The use of dogs, horses, and mules shall be permitted while hunting, but no person shall shoot while mounted on a horse or mule.
(c)  Legal hours for the hunting and taking of rabbits, hares, and squirrels shall be from ½ hour before sunrise to sunset during established hunting seasons, except that legal hours for the running and box-trapping of rabbits shall be 24 hours per day during established running seasons.
(d)  Any type of apparel may be worn while hunting or running rabbits.
(e)  Legally taken rabbits, hares, and squirrels may be possessed without limit in time and may be given to another if accompanied by a dated written notice that includes the donor’s printed name, signature, address, and permit or license number.  The person receiving the meat shall retain the notice until the meat is consumed, given to another, or otherwise disposed of.  (Authorized by and implementing K.S.A. 32-807 and K.S.A. 32-1002; effective, T-115-7-27-89, July 27, 1989; effective Sept. 18, 1989; amended, T-115-12-28-89, Dec. 28, 1989; amended Jan. 22, 1990; amended Sept. 19, 1997; amended June 1, 2001; amended July 23, 2004; amended Feb. 18, 2005.)


K.A.R. 115-3-2
115-5-2.  Furbearers and coyotes; possession, disposal, and general provisions.  (a) Legally taken raw furs, pelts, skins, carcasses, or meat of furbearers may be possessed without limit in time.
(b)  Live furbearers legally taken during a furbearer season may be possessed only through the last day of the season in which taken.
(c)  Legally acquired skinned carcasses and meat of furbearers may be sold or given to and possessed by another, and legally acquired raw furs, pelts, and skins of furbearers may be given to and possessed by another, if a written notice that includes the seller’s or donor’s name, address, and furharvester license number accompanies the carcass, pelt, or meat.  A bobcat, otter, or swift fox tag as described in subsection (f) shall meet the requirements of written notice.
(d)  Legally taken raw furs, pelts, skins, or carcasses of coyotes or legally taken live coyotes may be possessed without limit in time.
(e)  Any person in lawful possession of raw furbearer or coyote furs, pelts, skins, or carcasses may sell or ship or offer for sale or shipment the same to licensed fur dealers or any person legally authorized to purchase raw furbearer or coyote furs, pelts, skins, or carcasses.
(f)  Each bobcat, otter, or swift fox pelt legally taken in Kansas shall be submitted to the department so that an export tag provided by the department can be affixed to the pelt.
(1)  The pelt of any bobcat, otter, or swift fox taken in Kansas shall be presented to the department for tagging within seven days following closure of the bobcat, otter, or swift fox hunting and trapping season.
(2)  The lower canine teeth of any otter presented to the department for tagging shall be permanently surrendered to the department at the time of presentation.
(3) Each pelt presented for tagging shall be accompanied by the furharvester license number under which the pelt was taken.
(g)  Properly licensed persons may legally salvage furbearers and coyotes found dead during the established open seasons for hunting or trapping of furbearers or coyotes.  Salvaged furbearers and coyotes may be possessed or disposed of as authorized by this regulation.  (Authorized by and implementing K.S.A. 2012 Supp. 32-807 and K.S.A. 32-942; effective March 19, 1990; amended Oct. 17, 1994; amended Nov. 29, 1999; amended July 19, 2002; amended Sept. 4, 2009; amended July 22, 2011; amended July 26, 2013.)


K.A.R. 115-5-2


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K.A.R. 115-5-2
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5 comments:

  1. I noticed that you are missing information for Nebraska. I thought I would help you with that. I don't know anything about roadkill beyond deer, but in the state of Nebraska, "If a deer is struck and the driver wants to salvage it, the driver may possess the deer but must contact a Nebraska Game and Parks Commission conservation officer within 24 hours to obtain a salvage tag."
    http://www.roads.nebraska.gov/media/6502/dvcinformationkit.pdf

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  2. Texas law says do never pick up a hit deer alive or death no matter how bad is it

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  3. In MN it is legal to possess road killed deer if you report it to a conservation officer or the County Sheriff and are supplied with a tag that must be kept with any meat. You can also ask to be placed on a call list, and the Sheriff's office will notify you of road killed deer in your area for pickup and then you pick up the possession tag at the Sheriff's office.

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  4. WA recently changed the law. It's legal now to pick up deer or elk roadkill. You must submit and print a salvage permit within 24hrs. The permit must be kept with the meat until all edible parts are consumed.

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