Monday, June 6, 2016

Super Immune Boosting Mushroom Bone Broth

        


 Many of us have grown to know and love our bone broth for both its multitude of health benefits and its lovely flavor, but now it's time to take it to the next level. If you don't already make bone broth, you're in luck, you're starting a step ahead of the rest! Bone broth is extremely nourishing in its own right, but there is a whole world of highly medicinal foods out there that you can add to supercharge your broth and make a heartier soup! I'm not going into the health benefits of bone broth in this post as I've already written several about it, plus there are entire books on the topic! Including Nourishing Broth: An Old-Fashioned Remedy for the Modern World by Sally Fallon, which is one of my all time favorite cookbooks EVER, as many of you probably know by now. 

                                                                   

I will, on the other hand, discuss some of the benefits of the added ingredients I have included in the recipe below. 



Nettles
I've discussed nettles and their benefits previously in my post Foraging for Nettles, but will include a brief description here. Nettles are very high in vitamins A, B-6, K, and C, potassium, iron, magnesium, and calcium. In fact, a cup of cooked nettles contains 43% of daily recommendations for calcium.This herb (the leaf, root, and seeds are used) is used to treat a wide variety of ailments including hay fever, Alzheimer's, asthma, arthritis, bladder infections and UTI's, kidney stones, bronchitis, gingivitis, gout, prostate enlargement, and many, many more. It is often used for its diuretic, astringent, and anti-inflammatory properties. Nettles are known as a women's herb and are used by many pregnant women to stay strong and healthy as well as to ease childbirth. 

Nori or Other Seaweeds
Seaweed is highly nutritive, containing numerous vitamins and minerals, particularly vitamins A and C and calcium, but the true reason it is gaining popularity is it's extremely high iodine content. According to one article in the Huffington Post, one gram of brown seaweed contains 50 times your recommended daily intake of iodine! Iodine is an important addition to any diet as iodine deficiency can lead to thyroid problems. Some research also suggests that seaweed helps the body to regulate estrogen levels, meaning that it could potentially help to decrease chances of breast cancer and other ailments related to the reproductive organs. 

Garlic 
While one of the most widespread culinary herbs, this tasty allium has powerful herbal properties. It is used by some to prevent high cholesterol, heart attacks, hypertension, and other heart related conditions. It is also often cited for it's anticancer properties. Although, it is thought that many of the medicinal constituents are destroyed if heated. Either way, it's still delicious!

Burdock Root
Burdock root is often used as a digestive aid as it has a high inulin content. Inulin isn't digested by us, but by the good bacteria in our gut. This helps the bacteria to grow and reproduce, making more bacteria to help us digest our food! Since there are many vital processes that occur in the gut, some believe that by encouraging maximum digestive efficiency you can improve the overall health of the rest of your body. 

Chaga Mushroom
According to an article on the Foundation for Alternative and Integrative Medicine website tiled Research on Chaga by Nancy Faass MSW, MPH, the majority of the research on it has been focused on three areas: immunity, cancer, and diabetes. Faass states that chaga simultaneously boosts the immune system while also reducing inflammation. She continues with "This ability to normalize function qualifes chaga as an “adaptogen,” a substance that can either increase or decrease activity in the body as needed, to balance and restore appropriate functionality". Chaga also decreases blood glucose and cholesterol levels and helps regulate insulin levels, aiding diabetics. Chaga research pertaining to cancer has found that it has antioxidant and immune-stimulating effects which lead to the destruction of cancer cells without harming non-cancerous cells. 


Reishi Mushroom
Reishi is another powerful mushroom medicine. It's antibacterial, analgesic, antibacterial, anti-tumor, and many other "anti"s. Some believe it to be effective in lowering blood pressure, preventing bronchitis, and reducing the effects of caffeine as well as relaxing the muscles. It is also used to reduce stress and fatigue, prevent kidney and heart disease, treat altitude sickness, and even HIV.

Oyster Mushrooms
Oyster mushrooms are not only a delicious, high protein addition to your broths, they are rich in vitamins and minerals and have many medicinal properties. According to this fascinating article, these nematode-eating carnivorous fungi are ripe with lovastatin, a cholesterol lowering molecule. Research done by Jedinaki and Silva in 2008 found two alcohol soluble molecular mechanisms in oysters that inhibit the growth of colon and breast cancer, even outperforming similar tests done with shiitakes and other mushrooms. 

ACV
The internet is absolutely gushing about the health benefits of apple cider vinegar currently so I won't bore you with any more of that. One of the main reasons that I add it to my bone broth is because the acidity helps break down the bones more so that I can better extract every bit of nutrients from them as I can. 

Black Pepper
Like garlic, black pepper is another one of those hidden medicinals in our every day seasoning. Black pepper is used to improve digestion and gut health, weight loss, skin health, congestion, and antibacterial. Black pepper is most acclaimed for it's antioxidant properties, though. 

Himalayan Pink Sea Salt
According to Mountain Rose Herbs, "Regular consumption of Himalayan Pink salt provides essential minerals, trace elements, balances electrolytes, supports proper nutrient absorption, eliminates toxins, balances the body’s pH, and increases circulation".

RECIPE
Ingredients:
  • 1 Deer Leg Bone with meat (Substitute beef bones, 1 turkey carcass, etc)
  • Enough Water to Cover Bones
  • 5 Cups Raw Nettles or other green (nettle seed or root can also be added as desired)
  • 2 Sheets Nori, shredded
  • 4 TBS Garlic or Garlic Scapes
  • 1/2 Cup Burdock Root 
  • 4 TBS Ground Chaga
  • 4 TBS Ground Dry Reishi Mushroom
  • Handful of oyster mushrooms, shiitakes, or other wild mushrooms 
  • 3 TBS ACV with Mother 
  • 4 TBS Black Pepper 
  • Himalayan Pink Sea Salt to Taste 

Optional Additions:
This is by no means a recipe that you have to stick to 100%. Feel free to leave some items out or add extra ingredients depending on your own personal tastes, needs, and availability of some ingredients. This is simply the recipe I made, but yours may vary greatly. Here are some ideas:
  • Ashwaganda 
  • Astragalus Root
  • Turmeric 
  • Ginger
  • Miso 
  • Veggie Scraps 

To make, simply combine ingredients in a large crockpot or stock pot. Let simmer for 12-24 hours (the longer the better with bone broth). Remove bones after meat falls clean off and use broth plain or as base for other soups. Now it can be canned, frozen, refrigerated, dehydrated, or simple eaten up! To learn how to pressure can bone broth for later read my post How to Pressure Can Bone Broth.

Looking for more information? Here's more posts of mine about bone broth and the power of medicinal mushrooms!




Can't find the ingredients you're looking for at the store? Find it online:



Disclaimer: This blog is just my own opinion, nothing more. While I try my hardest, everything may not be completely accurate or complete. Sorry, I'm only human, so do not hold me accountable for anything you do to harm yourself or the world around you. I do make money from this blog (seriously not very much at all guys). If you click on any of the links in my blog I may make money from it, at no extra cost to you. I'm not sponsored by any of these people I just honestly love these products and want to give you the resources to find them. I am not a medical practitioner; consult a health professional before using any herbal remedies. I am not claiming to diagnose, treat, prevent, or cure any ailment.   

2 comments:

  1. Wow, sounds yummy. With all those great ingredients do you strain it before canning or just can it as more of a soup?

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    Replies
    1. Hi WMH Cheryl, you could can it either way, but it mostly depends on how much time you have. When pressure canning broth, you only have to can it for 20-30 minutes depending on the jar size. When you have anything solid in that broth, like meat, mushrooms, or greens in this case, you have to increase the canning time to 1 hour 15 minutes for pints to 1 hour 30 minutes for quarts. If you strain it be sure to make good use of all those good bits, maybe make a pot pie, tacos, or on pasta!

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